The Wild Edibles of Cumberland County

This page was made to complement the wild edible videos created for CFAN

Information has been gathered from various publications as well as from the internet.

Please, do not eat a wild plant without checking with a local expert first.

Several plants have look alike that can be toxic, some people may be allergic to certain plants, some wild edibles need to be cooked or processed in a certain way, others should only be eaten in small quantities.

Wild edibles can be the most nutritious, readily available, hardy, and free foods around. Why should we learn to identify, harvest, preserve, cook and nourish ourselves from what nature has been providing freely for millenniums? How does it fit into food security? How can we harvest wild edibles in a sustainable way?

Knowing the benefits of wild edibles as food as well as medicine can only make us appreciate the importance and urgency to preserve their habitats. If not for ourselves, for the ecosystem they are part of.

The following three videos explore the why, what, and how to cook a few local favorites.

        

 

Here is a great link to How, Where, and When to harvest wild edibles.

Which bring us to suggest that you Like our CFAN Facebook page for updates on events such as our free Annual Wild Plant Walk where you can learn from an expert.

Beach pea

March 4, 2016

Lemon clover

March 2, 2016

Fiddlehead

March 2, 2016

Wild rose

February 16, 2016

Wild strawberry

February 16, 2016

Indian pear

February 16, 2016

Bayberry

February 16, 2016

Goose tongue

February 16, 2016

Cattail

February 16, 2016

Violet

February 16, 2016

Lambsquarter

February 16, 2016

Nettle

February 16, 2016

Dandelion

February 16, 2016